New Tracey Emin sculpture and exhibition unveiled at outdoor art gallery in Edinburgh

It is said to represent “a different narrative” on a woman’s place in nature, compared to traditional sculptures of female nudes.

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Emin’s exhibition, her first in Scotland for 14 years, is described both as “an expression of love and hope” and “an unflinching look at pain, tenderness, longing and recovery”.

Tracey Emin has created a six-meter long bronze sculpture, I Lay Here For You ,, for Edinburgh’s outdoor gallery, Jupiter Artland.

The work in the show, which will run from May 29 until October 2, is also said to “address the power and fragility of the human form”.

Echoing her famous 1999 show at the Tate in London, Emin’s bed appears as a “recurring motif” in her new exhibition.

Most of the work in the exhibition, which is staged across Jupiter Artland’s various indoor gallery spaces, has been created over the past two years at Emin’s studio in Margate.

Originally due to stage a show at Jupiter Artland in 2020, her collaboration was delayed by the Covid pandemic and a cancer diagnosis that same year.

Tracey Emin has created a six-meter long bronze sculpture, I Lay Here For You ,, for Edinburgh’s outdoor gallery, Jupiter Artland.

A spokeswoman for Jupiter Artland said: “The exhibition takes its title and theme from Tracey Emin’s large-scale bronze figure I Lay Here For You, which the artist has sited in a woodland clearing on the threshold between a grove of mature beech trees and the surrounding pastureland.

“This female figure, monumental in scale and radiating both warmth and vulnerability, lies perpetually in wait.

“Her body resists onlookers, her gaze is turned in towards herself. She is alone.

Across Jupiter’s indoor galleries, the image of the artist’s bed appears as a recurring motif.

Tracey Emin has created a six-meter long bronze sculpture, I Lay Here For You ,, for Edinburgh’s outdoor gallery, Jupiter Artland.

“In one series, Emin takes a lithograph of a faintly outlined bed as the ground on which to overlay layers of Indian ink, with some being worked deeply, showing couples clinging to each other atop bedsheets, whilst others are left almost bare, with a lone figure traced out with minimal brush strokes. ”

Nicky Wilson, co-founder of Jupiter Artland with her husband Robert, said: “Our program this year will reflect the language of love through the artistic vulnerability and intimacy of Tracey Emin.

“Following Tracey’s illness, the pandemic and challenging world events, our ambition is for Jupiter Artland to be a place in which our visitors can discover love, nature and healing, reconnecting with themselves and others.”

Jupiter Artland has attracted more than one million visitors since it opened in 2009. It was shortlisted for the Art Fund’s coveted UK Museum of the Year title in 2016.

More than 30 artists created specially-commissioned works for the 100-acre site, including Antony Gormley, Anish Kapoor, Phyllida Barlow, Charles Jencks, Anish Kapoor, Christian Boltanski, Nathan Coley, Andy Goldsworthy and Jim Lambie.

Tracey Emin’s last exhibition in Scotland was a retrospective show at the Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art in Edinburgh.

Born in 1963, she has made her name working across drawing, painting, sculpture, film, photography and neon text.

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