Voice of Charlie Brown, Peter Robbins, has been found dead after suicide at the age of 65

Peter Robbins, Charlie Brown’s original voice, is dead, 65 years old.

The voice actor died of suicide last week, his family confirmed late Tuesday.

Robbins began his career as a child actor when he was nine years old, expressing the beloved Peanuts character in holiday classics, including 1965 A Charlie Brown Christmas and It’s A Great Pumpkin, Charlie Brown in 1966.

The actor was a big fan of his character and even got a tattoo of Charlie Brown and his faithful sidekick Snoopy.

Peter Robbins (pictured in 2008), who knew the voice of Peanuts character Charlie Brown, died of suicide last week, revealed his family

Peter Robbins (pictured in 2008), who knew the voice of Peanuts character Charlie Brown, died of suicide last week, revealed his family

The star started his career playing Brown at a young age of nine

The star started his career playing Brown at a young age of nine

Unfortunately, the former child actor, who suffered from bipolar disorder, has been troublesome later in life.

In 2015, he was sentenced to five years in prison for making criminal threats against several people.

He pleaded guilty to sending threatening letters to the media, offering money to kill San Diego County Sheriff Bill Gore and sending threatening letters to a property administrator in the mobile home park where he lived.

He reportedly sent drawings and letters to the property administrator and threatened other residents at the site.

He was originally ordered to probation while attending an internal substance abuse program, but was later jailed for violating his probation.

While in jail, he made threats against the sheriff and offered $ 50,000 to have him killed.

The actor was released in 2019.

The star, who also appeared on Munsters, managed to turn his life around and began promoting to get ‘professional help’ for mental health problems and was treated for drug, alcohol and sex addiction.

But the actor said it was his mental health that got him transferred to a state mental hospital in Atascadero, California.

The actor – who was released in 2019 and ordered not to drink or take drugs and had to take anger management courses – was released in a sober home in North County and began going in to take bipolar disorder ‘seriously’.

‘I would recommend anyone who has bipolar disorder to take it seriously because your life can turn around in a month like it did for me. I got out of jail and I’m a better person for it. I am much more humble and grateful and grateful that I went through the experience, he said at the time.

The actor was sentenced to five years in prison for making threats against the property manager of the mobile home park he lived in and against Sheriff Bill Gore of San Diego County in 2015. He was released in 2019

The actor was sentenced to five years in prison for making threats against the property manager of the mobile home park he lived in and against Sheriff Bill Gore of San Diego County in 2015. He was released in 2019

‘I got out of jail and I’m a better person for it,’ Robbins told Fox 5 in 2019. ‘I’m much more humble, grateful, and grateful that I went through the experience.’

Robbins said he was going through a ‘manic phase’ when he bought a ‘motorhome, a mobile home, two German sports cars and a Pitbull named Snoopy.’

After being released from prison, the actor got his Charlie Brown tattoo – placed on his right bicep – straightened and said it was a symbol that he was ‘renovating my life’.

His friend Brian Billeck posted a tribute on Twitter to honor the actor, writing, “I talked to him in late mid-December. He wanted people to see ‘The Charlie Brown Christmas Special.'” He said with everything was going on – the world could cope with a little bit of Charlie Brown & Linus’ ‘message.’

Many fans also posted tributes to the actor, saying he ‘made the world brighter’ and remembered childhood classic shows that they ‘loved’ so much.

His family is now asking for privacy and said they will hold a memorial service for him at a later date.

If you or a relative are struggling with suicidal ideation, please contact the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-TALK (8255), or contact the crisis text line by sending an SMS to TALK to 741741.

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