How to think holistically: A guide to tracking the right metric for your business

Do the people around you constantly praise the benefits of metrics and analytics? Network analytics, digital analytics, social media analysis, the list goes on. Yes, we get it. Metrics and ROI are very important. But do you feel overwhelmed? Don’t know where to start or which metrics to analyze in relation your special business environment?

The problem is the misconception that analytics starts with metrics. In reality, analytics should start systematically or holistically first with the situation of the organization (problem) that caused the need for analysis, and secondly your own subjective role in the analysis process. If you want to learn how to do this, especially in the context of social media analysis, read more.

What about subjectivity?

Assume in a typical analysis social media analytics, assume that data and social media groups are “there” and await analysis. This is not entirely accurate. Social network information, like all social information, is simply not “given” through real phenomena. Such information is analysts like you selectively collect according to your subjective judgments and predefined concepts.

As an analyst, you make many subjective judgments when analyzing a group of social media that is important to your business. First, you need to decide which group relationship (s) to focus on based on the context and objectives of your survey. For example, in a Twitter group, you can choose a follower relationship, a retweeting relationship, a “favorite tweet” relationship, or a mention relationship. You will also need to choose aspects of the social group structure on which the analysis will focus (e.g. network density).

You may also be interested in identifying influencers in specific social media groups for influencer marketing. In Hubspot No other marketing status report, CEO of TopRank Marketing says, “To win the content marketing game, brands need to focus more on an optimized, personal, and influencer-activated content experience.”

Before you can identify the key influencers, you, as an analyst, need to decide which of your definitions are the key influencers. For example, is there someone that is mentioned a lot by other members of the group, or has someone shared a lot of content? Is anyone connected to many other influencers, or does the user connect with members of the group who would otherwise be disengaged from the membership in general?

Such judgments of analysis are based on your an interpretation of the objectives / context of a particular survey, your understanding of the social media group being analyzed, and previous experiences with similar projects. As such, analytics is not purely objective. It is subjective.

You look at the social media group being analyzed from the organizational context and subjective frame of reference. Your past experiences, prejudices, and assumptions affect your subjective perceptions. Your subjective frame of reference influences the initial assumptions about the group, the choice of relationship to build the analysis, the choice of which social network structure to focus on, the metric (s) used to measure impact, and the relevance of results to the social media group and organization you belong to.

So how important it is for you to learn more about yours subjective perception both in the social media group being analyzed and in the business environment? It is vital because it can help you gain a more systematic / holistic view of the situation being analyzed. before you decide what information to follow. It can also help you explain the business value of tracking certain metrics to managers.

So how do you start doing this, you ask? We have some suggestions.

How to perform a holistic analysis?

1. Think of analytics as a social process or a group activity. Each analyst has their own subjective view of the organizational context / objectives of the analysis. If we want to create a holistic understanding, we need to bring these different views together and look at them as a whole. To do this, we need analysts to define and discuss their subjective views.

2. Visually present the subjective perception of analysts. We all know what we think. But if we really want to understand and debate different views, those views must be displayed as a visual object. Here is a System Map that the analyst created to represent his views in a particular social media group. Maps drawn by individual analysts should be shared and discussed among the team of analysts.

https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/i6zKnZVpp1EW8bZcxJvBlab8RYIMjyrUMP6Tbj_NiIPtb-Jo2zeVkBCC18E97fglqmKCzFhncUWdgkBOQIGZre0_2AzaGm5Ai5ExcUg

3. To the centers !! Debate!!! Debate!! Discussing individual system maps (or other visual objects) that represent analysts ’views can help with issues related to previously unknown organizational contexts (and the social media group). Such discussions help to clarify differences in analyst motivation and also highlight the common position. A holistic understanding is achieved when differences are reconciled and analysts can move toward the analytical situation at the group level.

4. Use subjectivity holistically as an analyst using the following questions.

  • What are your goals in doing this analytics project?
  • What benefits could you possibly get from doing this analytics project?
  • What risks could you possibly be exposed to by running this analytics project?
  • Is there anything in your wider environment or someone that could potentially stop or block the study or changes you want to make based on the results of the study?
  • In your wider environment, who are the stakeholders who would be interested in or affected by the research, and how will they influence them?
  • Who else is involved in this analytics project and how are they dealing with each other?
  • What level of formal authority do you need to make changes to the situation being analyzed or its wider environment?
  • In addition to the official authority, do you have any other informal resources that allow you to make changes to the situation being analyzed or its wider environment?
  • What changes or changes would you like to make to the situation under analysis or its wider environment based on the results of the study?
  • What are you going to learn from this analytics project?

The above questions can be tailored to answer different types of analytics projects. For example, when analyzing a social media group, you can use the following questions.

  • What are your goals to analyze this group of social media?
  • What benefits could you possibly get by analyzing this group?
  • What risks can you possibly be exposed to by analyzing this group?
  • Is there anything in your wider environment or someone that could potentially stop or block your polls or changes you want to make to your social media group and / or your wider environment based on the results of the survey?
  • In your wider environment, who are the stakeholders who would be interested in or affected by the research, and how will they influence them?
  • Who else is involved in this analytics project and how are they dealing with each other?
  • At what level of official authority do you need to make changes regarding how your company works with this social media group?
  • In addition to which official authority do you have other informal resources to help you make changes to how your business works with this social media group?
  • What kind of changes would you like to make to your company’s attitude towards this group of social media based on the results of the study?
  • What are you going to learn from this analytics project?

Conclusion

There are a few excerpts from this article.

First, as analysts, we need to learn holistically about the situation that created the need for analytics and its broader business environment. before considering what indicators to monitor.

Secondly, we must acknowledge that analytics is not entirely objective. We as analysts are asked to make many subjective judgments during the analysis. By recognizing our subjective views and creating opportunities to define and discuss these views, we can create a more systematic / holistic, group-level picture of the object / situation under consideration and the business environment in which it is located.

Third, we must recognize that analytics should be performed as an interactive group activity. When analysis is done as an interactive social process, we can discuss the individual perspectives of analysts and discover new insights that may arise when looking at individual perspectives. in combination with each other.

So if you’re confused about where to start your analysis process, which metrics to monitor, and how to identify relevant insights, don’t look any further. Start by thinking holistically.

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